Booklist – What I Read in July

The last time I posted my monthly reading I was 7 books behind schedule on my Goodreads challenge to read 50 books this year. I am happy to report I shaved that down a little bit and I am now only 4 books behind schedule. I’m doing it, Peter! (Shout out to anyone who gets my Hook reference.)

With that, I read A LOT this month. Summer is always great for reading because I find myself on the beach or on long train rides a lot more often than I do in any other season. Ready to know what I read? Here we go.

38447 The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

I gave in to cultural pressure and read The Handmaid’s Tale for the first time. After hearing some *gossip* about the TV show I was expecting gratuitous violence. What I got was an intelligent, disturbing read that unfolds with such elegance and poise in its language that I had a hard time putting it down. In a future that seems nearer than ever, I followed Offred in a world where women fill specific, often biological roles, and have no choice over their existence. Powerful. Jarring. I get it now.

 

 

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The End We Start From by Megan Hunter

I must have been in a post-apocalyptic mood because right after Handmaid’s I went right into Megan Hunter’s stunning novella about a couple and their newborn surviving the destruction of London. The story is tight, never revealing anything without its emotional impact on the main character and you, the reader. This reminded me of a feminine spin on The Road. 

 

 

41laq7WUsZL._SX334_BO1,204,203,200_The Jaws Log by Carl Gottlieb 

I took myself out of fiction for a breather with The Jaws Log, suggested to me by my Jaws-obsessed boyfriend. I was happily surprised to find I couldn’t put this book down! Written by one of the screenwriters of the film, this book shares all the behind the scenes details of the making of this movie. It is, absolutely, an incredible book to read if you have any interest in movie-making at all.

 

 

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Woman Code by Alisa Vitti

An influencer I follow on Instagram suggested this book to her followers and once I looked it up it sounded exactly like what I needed. I know the cover can be intimidating: FERTILITY?! SEX DRIVE?! But honestly, it is an amazing book all about syncing your life to your cycle– how to eat, workout etc. all so you live in harmony with your body instead of against it. I am obsessed and continue to go back to it for reference every day. Can’t wait to use it more!

 

41ybG235TcL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_ The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

Last week when my little brother was staying over he looked at my boyfriend’s bookcase and pointed to this to say, “One of my favorites.” So I picked it out for my next read. It’s fiction but reads very much like a guide to life, meditation, and believing in your own greatness and the greater energy of the world (whether that’s God to you or something else). It’s a lovely tale and I can see myself reading it again when I need a boost spiritually.

 

41x8eLYN-kL._SX328_BO1,204,203,200_ Dare Me by Megan Abbott 

I read a review of Megan Abbott’s newest book Give Me Your Hand  in New York Mag last month and I knew I had to read her other books immediately. I am writing a Western that focuses around a girl of about 15. I have a hard time balancing some pretty adult themes with her age. Abbott does this seamlessly. So I picked up Dare Me first and I was BLOWN away by the craft and energy of this book. I just found a new author that I LOVE!

 

There it is! My books from July. Let me know if you’ve read any of these or if you have suggestions for August. I am planning lots of beach time!

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What I Read in June, Booklist

According to Goodreads, I’m 7 books behind schedule for my Reading Challenge. I wanted to get through 50 books this year! While I feel pretty terrible about that I forget all the time I spend reading long form journalism, so I know my brain isn’t totally atrophying. I guess this means I will just have to spend LOTS of time on the beach with lots of books this summer to catch-up. Send me any suggestions you have… I am always looking.

BTW, you can follow my reading on Goodreads by adding me HERE.

anobr.PNG Another Brooklyn, by Jacqueline Woodson

A beautifully woven story about girls becoming young women in 1970s Brooklyn. The story moves between the present and past with ease. At times I was frightened for the young women and at other times so in awe of their strength and bond of friendship. Totally enthralling and moving. And a good reminder to all writers out there that stories don’t need a beginning, middle, and end, they just need to be good stories.

 

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Bright Lines by Tanwi Nandini Islam

I was apparently on a very intense New York City- in-summer kick without knowing it. Seriously, I picked up both these books and realized their connection only after I finished them. Bright Lines follows a Bangladeshi family through an intense year of change and secrets revealed. The most magnificent part of this story is how it handles gender fluidity and queerness in an intelligent and sensitive way. One of the best books I read this year. I couldn’t put it down.

 

sat  Sex and the City and Us by Jennifer Keishin Armstrong

I once had the pleasure of taking a class with JKA years ago at Gotham Writers. This was just before her book Seinfeldia had hit the best sellers list. With that and my total OBSESSION with the cultural impact of Sex and the City (and my overall love of the show) this was a no brainer. I don’t buy many books anymore but I bought this one. And read it in THREE days. If you love cultural commentary and TV studies. Get thee to the bookshop.

 

answers The Answers by Catherine Lacey 

Well, I actually managed to get through a month only reading books by women! It wasn’t intentional but I am proud of that achievement. I picked this one up at the library based alone on the cover and intrigued by the idea of being hired as a girlfriend. The structure of this story alone hooked me as a writer, I don’t want to give it away, but there is a break in the middle of the book in POVs and it has been a most excellent lesson for me as I adventure on my own novel. If you like the melding of new age healing techniques mashed with science, give it a whirl.

What I Read in April

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It’s another two book month because I’ve been traveling like crazy for the good ol’ day job. And you would think I’d get a lot of reading on done on the plane but lately I’ve just been trying to squeeze in a little bit more sleep or just rest because it has been non-stop. I also picked a real difficult book this month that was not for speeding through. Read on to find out what it was!

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I was really excited to read Elizabeth Gilbert’s latest non-fiction book. Categorized as “self-help” this book is all about letting go of fear and worry to unlock your creative potential. While there were definite moments of “Oh!” and “Love it!” I mostly plodded along feeling like I had read a lot of it before. While I appreciated that she is a little less woo-woo thank other self-help books, I didn’t walk away feeling unchanged or different about my creative outlook. I did appreciate her recognition that we need to take breaks creatively once and awhile that it’s all part of the game. Especially because this month has not been creatively fueled. I’d pick it up if you’ve never done a self-help book before.
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Now this was the tricky book I picked up. I could only read it in sections of 20-30 pages at a time before I feel like my brain had been roasted like a cauliflower. I didn’t notice that the quote on the front was from STEPHEN HAWKING until much later but I probably should have known better. This book is about how randomness rules our lives (so cool) but handle it through mathematical theory and probability theory. Whew. I found most of it interesting, even when I was struggling and in the end it was a super rewarding read and I am glad I stuck with it. It supports a lot of self-book theories actually, just in an extremely different way. If you’re looking for a challenge (like a class in college you’d want to drop after the first week)… this is for you.

Hopefully in May we will see the return of a book a week. But until then, I hope you try these very distinct books out and tell me what you think!

 

What I Read in February (Hint: Just Westerns)

Before I get to the books I read this month (all of them are Westerns if you can believe it), I’m taking a moment to answer a question I get a lot: How do you read so many books? 

I read about a book a week depending on their length and difficulty. Really intricate, heady pieces take me more time because I  need longer breaks in between sessions to digest all the information. I get through a lot of books because…

1) It is important to me. I make time of reading before bed and I use my commute to read instead of listening to music. I actually get about 80% of my reading done on the subway. Start calculating how much time you spend in front of a TV, phone, or computer and shave some of it off and reserve it for reading. It’s a lot… I assure you.

2) If I don’t like a book I stop reading it. It’s rare, but if I am struggling with a book or I just don’t like it, I stop reading it. I lose my momentum and joy for reading when I force myself through something I do not enjoy. Life is too short to be miserable with a book.

3) I am naturally a fast reader but I promise you, the more you do it, the easier it becomes.

Also, I am happy to discuss reading anytime so drop me a note and let’s chat! I’m super passionate about libraries and books so never hesitate to share your published works, pleas for $ to your local library, or book donations. These are causes I want to support.

Ok, on to THE BOOKS! I was so excited for this post this month. I cannot believe I didn’t share the books I read on here until recently. It’s such a huge part of my life and seems now so strange in retrospect.

This month I read 3 westerns. I started writing a western for fun (probably to never see the light of day) but I wanted to get more context for the world I was building so I grabbed a few “classics.”
purpleRiders of the Purple Sage – This book came up on multiple lists as THE book responsible for starting the western trend and being perhaps the most popular western of all time. So you see why I had to read it. First, let me say, I had so many issues with the female characters in this book, it’s hard to give it a high rating. I feel like I can’t publicly say “I loved it!” But, since it was written in 1912, I’m giving it a pretty big pass and admitting the women of this novel are much more complex than I could have ever expected. (But I still have a lot of issues.)

The world that Grey builds is vibrant and moving and we’re introduced, for the first time, to what will become western tropes for years to come (Gunslinger, The Rustler, Determined Homesteader, The Missionary). Which is super fun to see. What I found so interesting about this book is its depiction and story of Mormons in the Old West. I had never even considered the relationship of outlaws, settlers, and gunmen to the formation of the Mormon capital in Utah. Unexpected, but incredibly enjoyable to read about.

my-antonia-willa-cather-paperback-cover-artMy Antonia – Not your traditional Western (there are no Gunslingers or Rustlers here) but an important book to the American West all the same. I have a lot of Midwestern friends who are obsessed with this book and now that I’ve finally read it I see why. Nebraska’s landscape and harsh climate are a main character and how the settlers (mostly immigrants) interact with that land is a huge part, if not all, of the book. I learned a great deal about the early Midwest, but I was also deeply invested in the outcomes of Jim’s (our narrator) and Antonia’s (it’s really her story) lives. Beautifully written and engaging. I wanted more when the book was done!

 

gunslingerThe Gunslinger – This Stephen King book is on the opposite end of the Western spectrum. If My Antonia is about settling the land and creating the Midwest as we know it today, then the Gunslinger is about what happens when we destroy all of that. Set in a post-apocalyptic alternate universe (uh, yeah), we follow Gunslinger on his quest for ultimate truth from The Man in Black. As you can see, we’re working with traditional Western tropes in a completely non-traditional setting (there are mutants and super natural powers at hand). Despite how King lends you no assistance into introducing you to this world (you just dive in and learn along the way) I was really taken with the Gunslinger character, his own darkness, and the hunt for truth… because I never really knew whose “truth” I should trust. There is apparently 5 more books in this series and I will probably get to them in due time.

Do you have any favorite Westerns? Send ’em my way. I am on a kick for sure.

January Book Round-Up

Hey everyone! I have always wanted to share book reviews on here but I never really felt like I had place or voice to do so. Then I realized that’s all bullshit and any of us can do whatever we want as long as what we’re putting out in the world is honest, coming from a place of love, and the best work we can possibly do.

Yes! I am finally starting to embrace what this blog is all about. Only took me like 3 years.

So starting now I’ll be sharing brief reviews and synopses from the books I read every month. I am warning you now– I never stick to one genre, author, or theme. I read all over the place, all the time. There MAY be an uptick of Western stuff in the coming months as I research a project of mine, but that’s about it.

BNBlue Nights – Joan Didion

Blue Nights picks up where The Year of Magical Thinking left off. Both are memoirs of grief that Didion captures with heartfelt honesty and clarity. In Blue Nights Didion floods light into every dark memory and turns over each happy memory again and again like a stone. We are very much in her mind, rattling through her thoughts with her, no matter how repetitive or meditative. Personally, I love The Year of Magical Thinking more because of its depth and narrative, but it is easy to do that. To enjoy Blue Nights you must be willing to do the work alongside her. It’s tough but rewarding.

 

bedWomen in Bed: Nine Stories – Jessica Keener

Lately I’ve been giving short stories a whirl. After buying Roxanne Gay’s recent collection, I remembered the things I loved about the form and have decided to return. (I left because they reminded me of poorly structured school assignments…) Jessica Keener’s collection of stories follows women of all walks facing changes both in their control and not. The first of my favorite stories, “Boarders”, tells the story of a college-aged woman living in a boarding house with elderly men while sorting out her dating life. It highlights how we often seek shelter in the wrong places. My other favorite, “Recovery”, is the heartbreaking tale of sudden death and survival and how we don’t always have the answers we need. The depth of pain in this story is contrasted against the stark hospital surroundings and left me deeply moved. Some of the characters lose depth from time to time, but overall it was an engaging read.

 

Strangers on a Train – Patricia Highsmithstrangers

How I missed this one until now is it’s own mystery. (See what I did there?) Many of you will know this story from Alfred Hitchcock’s film of the same name. I also haven’t seen the movie so being able to read the book prior to doing so (I am definitely going to now) was a real treat. At first I felt like the story started out slow and I was getting a tiny bit frustrated with the sedate and steady unfolding. How wrong I was! Highsmith builds a wild, important world and all that slow sharing really pays off in the end. This is a crime novel like nothing I’ve read and really focuses on how ordinary people can be driven to commit crimes they never imagined they could. I am obsessed with how Highsmith weaves this story and keeps you on board until the end. Incredible book to pick up ASAP.

 

elephant-vanishesThe Elephant Vanishes – Haruki Murakami (Translated by Jay Rubin & Alfred Birnbaum)

Before this collection of short stories the only book by Murakami I had read was his memoir What I Talk About When I Talk About Running which I read during my giant memoir phase. At this time, I was also super interested in writer’s working schedules and routines and how they incorporated fitness. I loved the ease with which he wrote that story and was interested to see how it would play into fiction. Fast forward a couple years to now–I’m on my short story kick and the boyfriend owns this one. Win! Murakami’s stories are enticing, and weird, and sexy all at the same time. No two stories are the same, though there are lots of reoccurring themes, and I didn’t have trouble getting on board with the more sci-fi level stuff. However, there are few female characters I identify with, and a couple times questioned how he represents women in his work, but overall the language and storytelling were unique and powerful.

Can’t wait to share new books with you next month. Let me know what you think of this new section and you can keep up with my reading list DAILY by following me on Goodreads! CLICK HERE.