What I Read in February (Hint: Just Westerns)

Before I get to the books I read this month (all of them are Westerns if you can believe it), I’m taking a moment to answer a question I get a lot: How do you read so many books? 

I read about a book a week depending on their length and difficulty. Really intricate, heady pieces take me more time because I  need longer breaks in between sessions to digest all the information. I get through a lot of books because…

1) It is important to me. I make time of reading before bed and I use my commute to read instead of listening to music. I actually get about 80% of my reading done on the subway. Start calculating how much time you spend in front of a TV, phone, or computer and shave some of it off and reserve it for reading. It’s a lot… I assure you.

2) If I don’t like a book I stop reading it. It’s rare, but if I am struggling with a book or I just don’t like it, I stop reading it. I lose my momentum and joy for reading when I force myself through something I do not enjoy. Life is too short to be miserable with a book.

3) I am naturally a fast reader but I promise you, the more you do it, the easier it becomes.

Also, I am happy to discuss reading anytime so drop me a note and let’s chat! I’m super passionate about libraries and books so never hesitate to share your published works, pleas for $ to your local library, or book donations. These are causes I want to support.

Ok, on to THE BOOKS! I was so excited for this post this month. I cannot believe I didn’t share the books I read on here until recently. It’s such a huge part of my life and seems now so strange in retrospect.

This month I read 3 westerns. I started writing a western for fun (probably to never see the light of day) but I wanted to get more context for the world I was building so I grabbed a few “classics.”
purpleRiders of the Purple Sage – This book came up on multiple lists as THE book responsible for starting the western trend and being perhaps the most popular western of all time. So you see why I had to read it. First, let me say, I had so many issues with the female characters in this book, it’s hard to give it a high rating. I feel like I can’t publicly say “I loved it!” But, since it was written in 1912, I’m giving it a pretty big pass and admitting the women of this novel are much more complex than I could have ever expected. (But I still have a lot of issues.)

The world that Grey builds is vibrant and moving and we’re introduced, for the first time, to what will become western tropes for years to come (Gunslinger, The Rustler, Determined Homesteader, The Missionary). Which is super fun to see. What I found so interesting about this book is its depiction and story of Mormons in the Old West. I had never even considered the relationship of outlaws, settlers, and gunmen to the formation of the Mormon capital in Utah. Unexpected, but incredibly enjoyable to read about.

my-antonia-willa-cather-paperback-cover-artMy Antonia – Not your traditional Western (there are no Gunslingers or Rustlers here) but an important book to the American West all the same. I have a lot of Midwestern friends who are obsessed with this book and now that I’ve finally read it I see why. Nebraska’s landscape and harsh climate are a main character and how the settlers (mostly immigrants) interact with that land is a huge part, if not all, of the book. I learned a great deal about the early Midwest, but I was also deeply invested in the outcomes of Jim’s (our narrator) and Antonia’s (it’s really her story) lives. Beautifully written and engaging. I wanted more when the book was done!


gunslingerThe Gunslinger – This Stephen King book is on the opposite end of the Western spectrum. If My Antonia is about settling the land and creating the Midwest as we know it today, then the Gunslinger is about what happens when we destroy all of that. Set in a post-apocalyptic alternate universe (uh, yeah), we follow Gunslinger on his quest for ultimate truth from The Man in Black. As you can see, we’re working with traditional Western tropes in a completely non-traditional setting (there are mutants and super natural powers at hand). Despite how King lends you no assistance into introducing you to this world (you just dive in and learn along the way) I was really taken with the Gunslinger character, his own darkness, and the hunt for truth… because I never really knew whose “truth” I should trust. There is apparently 5 more books in this series and I will probably get to them in due time.

Do you have any favorite Westerns? Send ’em my way. I am on a kick for sure.


2 thoughts on “What I Read in February (Hint: Just Westerns)

  1. Thought I would recommend Suki Kim’s, “The Interpreter”. It kind of a murder mystery with immigrant identity issues mixed together. Well written. It is actually an a novel from 2003. I came to it after reading her non-fiction book, “Without You: There Is No Us”–her experience of teaching in North Korea. You may have seen her on TED talks. Excellent!

    Liked by 1 person

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